Native News

Tue
27
Mar

Public Invited to Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair

Those interested in Native American cultures are invited to attend the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History’s 16th annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair as the event kicks off once again April 2 and 3. The fair celebrates language diversity and recognizes the efforts of students and teachers to revitalize Native American language and heritage.

From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, visitors have the chance to immerse themselves in Native American languages as students from across the state participate in live presentations of song, speech and story. Visitors also can view students' poster art as well as comics and cartoons as part of the material submission categories. Native language speakers, teachers and elders serve as judges for the competitions.

 

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Tue
16
Jan

Ancient DNA Gives Glimpse of Ancestors of Native Americans

NEW YORK (AP) — DNA from an infant who died in Alaska some 11,500 years ago is giving scientists the best look yet at the genetics of the ancestors of today's native peoples of the Americas.

Decoding the infant's complete set of DNA let researchers estimate the timing of key events in the ancestral history of today's Native Americans and indigenous peoples of Canada and Central and South America.

Expert said that while the new work doesn't radically change the outlines of what scientists have thought, it provides more detail and better evidence than what was available before.

 

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Tue
16
Jan

Native American Identity Absent from Urban Schools

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Most of Oklahoma's nearly 130,000 Native American students attend school in small towns, often in communities where their tribe's history is woven into the town's patchwork.

But for the 20 percent of Native students who attend a school in the state's two largest metro areas, cultural connections can be harder to find, especially when it comes to a specific identity.

"Our Native program doesn't include Native language because I have 77 tribes represented (throughout the district), so if I pick one language someone is going to be upset or left out," said Star Yellowfish, director of Native American student services for Oklahoma City Public Schools.

 

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Tue
05
Dec

Statue of Comanche Leader Quanah Parker Dedicated in Texas

SNYDER, Texas (AP) — Quanah Parker stands again above the Texas plain. Poised with spear in hand, he's turned eastward, ready to mount his horse and face the future once more.

The Abilene Reporter- News reports the bronze statue, crafted by Abilene artist Terry Gilbreth, was installed on the campus of Western Texas College in front of the Scurry County Museum. Commissioned in 2011 on the centennial of Parker's death, it finally was dedicated Nov. 16 in a ceremony attended by descendants of the Comanche chief.

Parker is one of the most complex and revered figures to emerge from the bloody history of westward expansion in Texas during the second half of the 19th century. His story is one of pain, sacrifice and, ultimately, hope.

 

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Tue
28
Nov

Northwestern Faculty, Staff Honored for Years of Service at 14th Annual Ceremony

Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s employees were honored during the 14th annual Employee Service Recognition Ceremony Nov. 14-15. Ceremonies were held in Alva and Enid to honor employees who work at Alva, Enid and Woodward campus locations.

Dr. Bo Hannaford, vice president for academic affairs, presented Dr. M. Cris Gordon, assistant professor of psychology and chair to the psychology department, the John Barton Distinguished Teaching and Service Award during the annual ceremony. Nominations for the award are made by faculty, staff and students then the recipient is determined by a selection committee. To be selected, the recipient must be a full-time faculty member at Northwestern and exemplify distinguished teaching and administrative leadership.

Tue
03
Oct

Native American Twins at OSU to Research Insect- Related Diseases

(STILLWATER, Okla., Oct. 2, 2017) – Twins Taylor and Alexis Coles, Oklahoma State University entomology freshmen from Norman, have done everything together from day one. Now, their joint interest in the study of insects will take them on an adventure that could help improve the health of their fellow tribal nation members.

Thanks to a grant to the Center for Sovereign Nations at OSU, the pair will join Dr. Wyatt Hoback in a research program that is exploring reasons Native Americans suffer twice the rate of certain insectrelated diseases, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, than non-natives.

Taylor and Alexis, who are members of the Choctaw Nation, are two of six Native American students who have received research funding from the grant, which partners the center, the Choctaw Nation and the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology at OSU.

 

Tue
29
Aug

HUD-VASH Helps Homeless Veterans Have a Place to Call Home

During the 2015 annual convention of the National Congress of American Indians, then HUD Secretary Julian Castro announced a new demonstration program for Native American Veterans.

The HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) rental assistance for homeless Veterans with case management and clinical services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

The Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes were one 26 tribes selected to be a part of the HUD-VASH program, and though the process has been long and sometimes unbearable, three Cheyenne & Arapaho tribal veterans now have a place to call home … and more are in the process of being approved.

 

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Tue
29
Aug

OSU Tops in Native Americans Earning Degrees in Engineering

Oklahoma State University has the highest number of Native Americans earning bachelor degrees in engineering, as well as engineering technology degrees, among all the engineering schools in North America, according to data from the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE).

“We’re proud to be leading the way nationally, but what’s really important is that we’re making progress and Native American students are responding to our invitation to earn highly-skilled degrees that offer real promise for success in their chosen fields of engineering,” said Dr. Paul Tikalsky, dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology (CEAT) at OSU.

 

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Tue
15
Aug

100th Anniversary of the Oklahoma Indian American Baptist Assn.

The Oklahoma Indian said. American Baptist Association (OIABA), was established 100 years ago and formally known as the Western Oklahoma Indian Association. The annual camp meetings were being held by early day churches as early as 1893.

The Annual Camp meetings were being held in a large tent which was often called the 'Big Top'. Family camps and arbors were set up around the big meeting tent. It was a time of Christian fellowship, Indian hymns of different tribes, association business and worship services. The Big Top and camping will be part of the four day celebration to be held at the Deyo Mission Baptist Church, located west of Lawton, Oklahoma, beginning Wednesday, August 23rd to Saturday, August 26th.

 

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Tue
15
Aug

Santa Fe Indian Market Fuses Tradition with Contemporary Art

For nearly a century, American Indian jewelers, potters and other artists have been gathering in the heart of northern New Mexico to show off their creations at one of the nation's most prestigious art markets.

The annual Santa Fe Indian Market begins Saturday as organizers push ahead with raising the bar for showcasing what they say are the best examples of art that has evolved from centuries-old traditions.

Some artists and their families have participated for years, but this marks the first time organizers have shifted entirely to a juried application process that has resulted in fierce competition.

 

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